Ubisoft have released lots of fantastic game trailers and gameplay videos of their upcoming title Assassin’s Creed: Unity, and it looks fantastic. However, some people have pointed out that it is a bit strange that everyone in the game speaks with an English accent despite the fact the game is set in France during the French Revolution.

The game’s creative designer, Alex Amancio explained why this was whilst speaking to the folks over at Ubi blog. “The idea is that the Animus is translating everything into the language you’re playing in. That’s why, since you’re an Anglophone, you’re hearing all the dialogue and cinematics in English. It would really make no sense for there to be a French accent because that would mean that this French character is trying to address you in accented English. Everyone in the game is not trying to speak English for your benefit,” he explained.

He also went on to reveal that the language may be spoken in English accents but that it will feature old words and phrases that will make players feel as though they are in a bygone era. Apparently the English version is one of two language settings that will feature in the game. The second setting will have everyone speaking in French but with English subtitles for those who want to be fully immersed.

“The only lines that are going to be translated into English are gameplay-related elements that we need to convey to the player.” Amancio explained, “Everything else is in French. You’ll really have the immersion of walking around in Paris and hearing everyone speaking French.”

Assassin’s Creed: Unity is due to be released on December 4th in Japan, November 11th in North America, and November 13th in Europe for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

1 Comment

  1. I still find it strange.  It’s been the standard for a lot of movies to have people speaking with that accent (for example, a movie about Russians, everyone speaks in a Russian accent when speaking “Russian”).

    At the same time, we’ve pretty much always used English accents not just to stand in for “foreign” but usually for French specifically (see: Jean-Luc Picard) – so it’s not like Ubisoft originated this idea.

  2. I still find it strange.  It’s been the standard for a lot of movies to have people speaking with that accent (for example, a movie about Russians, everyone speaks in a Russian accent when speaking “Russian”).

    At the same time, we’ve pretty much always used English accents not just to stand in for “foreign” but usually for French specifically (see: Jean-Luc Picard) – so it’s not like Ubisoft originated this idea.

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